Sep 16

Beat Breakthrough 002 – Decap

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In our second ever instalment of Beat Breakthrough we talk with San Francisco based producer Decap. When it comes to making beats Decap goes way back making his start at just 13 years of age. Find out about three beats that have shaped Decap’s progression as a producer.

What is the oldest or one of the older beats that you can find? Tell us the story behind it.

Beat Name: “Believing in D.E.A.T.H.” 
I made this beat in the summer of 2000 at age 15 when I started getting serious about making beats. I made the drums in a really old version of Fruity Loops and recorded the sample chops on my Boss SP-202 into Cool Edit 96. I can’t remember the exact sample, but it was off a record I bought at a local flea market.

A beat that represents a turning point in your production career?

Beat Name: Feeling
I made the skeleton of this beat in 2014 in like 10 minutes. I ended up releasing it as a single in 2015 (after spending 3 months tweaking it), alongside a video of me performing it on Push with Ableton. I feel like this track helped solidify my solo music career. A transition from behind the scenes producer, to artist and live performer.

The latest song or beat you are most proud of. And why? 

Beat Name: Wake Up!

I just made this beat this year. I feel like the music, sonic quality, and quirkiness represents where I want to take my sound. I’m proud of this track

Play Decap’s brand new Melodics lessons entitled ‘Samurai Homecoming’ now!


Sep 09

An Interview With 69 Beats – How He Went From A Melodics Student To A National Champion

by in Melodics, Music, New Lesson Tuesdays

Polish DJ 69Beats won this years Red Bull Thre3style Poland Championship with an incredible set that involved classic turntablism, live remixing, tone play and finger drumming. While only young he has been in the game for a long time rocking shows and Festivals in Poland since 2008. Late last year 69Beats became a Melodics user and immediately captured our attention with a series of videos he put out on social media. We wanted to speak with him about his DJ journey so far and how Melodics has helped him improve his craft a long the way.

When did you start Djing? What/who inspired you to begin?

I started learning in 2006. Although the music was always in my life – my mom and older brother play the piano, dad plays the guitar and I finished musical school playing piano as well – the DJing came into my life with a total impulse. Even though I loved to party I never thought about DJing. But one day I went to a party at my friends house and her brother was a DJ. When she showed me his room with all the DJ gear standing there I was like… dang… that’s something I want to learn. Like the love at first sight. It didn’t even cross my mind that I could do this for a living someday, I just wanted to learn this.

How did you discover Melodics and what made you download the app?
I was into the fingerdrumming for quite some time before discovering Melodics, but didn’t have the gear to learn it properly. I just had some samples loaded into my DVS and was trying to come up with my own patterns that worked for me at the parties. And when Melodics came out I happened upon the video of Eskei83 where he played one of the basic lessons. And again I was like – I need to have this! I’m totally into the video games and apps that make a real challenge, and this challenge is measurable. Melodics has it all – the fun, the challenge, and on top of all – you learn a real thing, not only score points for hitting the right buttons on your gaming controller.

Back in 2015 you sent through to us a video of you playing Funk Bass on Melodics. How long did it take you to learn to play that lesson?
I enjoyed this lesson so much that when I started it I just couldn’t stop, but it was also very exhausting for my head. Spinscott has very cool patterns, they might seem really hard to learn for the first time, but they are also very smart, so when you learn it for the first time f.e. with Funk Bass, the other Spinscotts lessons aren’t that hard to play. So Funk Bass was the first one of his lessons for me and it took me like 2 or 3 days to get to 3 stars

What is the best thing about learning with Melodics so far?
>The best thing for me is that skills aquired with it can be easly used in real DJing environment – in the club, during a performance etc. – Melodics helps a lot with exploring your own creativity and building self confidence on the pads.

You entered and won the Red Bull Thre3style Poland this year. Was this your first time entering this competition? How did Melodics help with your preparations

Actually that was my second attempt at RB3S. First time was in 2015 and it didn’t really play out as I planned. When Melodics came out it was a total game changer for me. I left all other training for a few weeks just to play it. I wanted my Thre3style set to be as versatile as possible and there were no better way to gain necessary skill on the pads than Melodics.

Talk us through your winning set. There is so much going in terms of creativity. How long did it take you to put it all together and what was your creative process?

So as I said I entered Thre3style in 2015, but everything was happening really fast then and there was not much time for preparations. I didn’t make it to the Polish final, but took a lesson and decided to start preparations for 2016 since the moment I dropped out. I began to write down every single idea for routines that I came up with. Whether it was using a short single sample or creating some long transitions – I was writing down everything. Then I was testing all those ideas at home and finally if they felt good – I tried them in the clubs. So when RB3S 2016 was announced I just opened up my notebook, chose the best routines and started wondering what will be the best way to build a set with them. I didn’t have a problem with building a 15 minute set. My problem was fitting all my ideas into the 15 minutes so it won’t go any longer

You have The Red Bull Thre3style World Finals coming up in Chile later this year. How are you feeling before this event and what can we expect to see more of from you performance wise?

I feel very motivated and just can’t wait too perform before the Thre3style community again. To be true I don’t even know what can I expect from myself. I’m the type of guy that changes everything till the very last moment, so it can be everything. For now I’m focusing on my basic technique, so I hope that my sets on the finals will be more “clear”. What else will happen? I guess we’ll have to wait till December

Any words you want to give to all the Melodics users out there?
Sure! Always have fun with Melodics, don’t give up, don’t underestimate yourself and don’t underestimate Melodics itself. It’s a powerfull tool that can make a huge difference in your performances. Don’t be afraid to use the skill gained with Melodics at your gigs it really works. And remember that everybody loves skillful fingers.

Sep 09

5 Future Bass Tracks You Should Listen To

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This week Melodics has released brand new lesson Future Bass lessons called ‘Aurora’. To mark the occasion the team has decided to share five future bass songs that we rather like.

1. Lindsay Lowend – GT40

With one of the best producer names in the Future Bass scene, Lindsay Lowend dropped GT40 three years back.

2. Hayden James – Something About You (ODESZA Remix)

Hayden James with the original and ODESZA on the remix. Doesn’t get much better than this.

3. SPZRKT & Sango – How Do You Love Me

Sango has made numerous collaborations with singers and rappers in his short career. His LP with SPZRKT entitled ‘Hours Spent Loving You’ was a masterpiece.

4. Cashmere Cat – Secrets + Lies

Norwegian producer Cashmere Cat ascended into prominence in 2013 with a string of popular remixes. Since then he has gone on to collaborate with The Weeknd.

5. Flume – Take A Chance (Featuring Little Dragon)

A future bass list would not be complete without a song from Flume. The Australian producer continues to grow, with his signature sound heavily influencing the next crop of future bass producers.


Sam Gellaitry – Long Distance

Had to add in an extra tune from Sam Gellaitry. At only 17 years of age this Scottish producer shows it is never to early to make amazing music.

Want to learn the fundamentals behind making Future Bass beats? Try our brand new lessons ‘Aurora’ available on the Melodics Software.